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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 2: The CC receives blood supply from both the anterior (pink) and posterior (blue) circulation. In about 80% of individuals, the most anterior region (including the rostrum and genu) is supplied by a branch (dark pink) arising from the anterior communicating artery. The CC anterior to the splenium is supplied by arteries, which branch off the pericallosal trunk (dark pink) of the anterior cerebral artery (light pink). The splenium is supplied by arteries which branch off the posterior pericallosal artery (dark blue), a branch off the posterior cerebral artery (light blue). Vessels arising from the anterior and posterior circulation typically anastomose within the splenium.[18],[19] Ischemic injuries more commonly involve the splenium (63%, yellow) than the rostrum and genu (27%, yellow) or the body (26%, yellow). In 15% of cases, more than one CC area is affected. CC: Corpus callosum

Figure 2: The CC receives blood supply from both the anterior (pink) and posterior (blue) circulation. In about 80% of individuals, the most anterior region (including the rostrum and genu) is supplied by a branch (dark pink) arising from the anterior communicating artery. The CC anterior to the splenium is supplied by arteries, which branch off the pericallosal trunk (dark pink) of the anterior cerebral artery (light pink). The splenium is supplied by arteries which branch off the posterior pericallosal artery (dark blue), a branch off the posterior cerebral artery (light blue). Vessels arising from the anterior and posterior circulation typically anastomose within the splenium.<sup>[18],[19]</sup> Ischemic injuries more commonly involve the splenium (63%, yellow) than the rostrum and genu (27%, yellow) or the body (26%, yellow). In 15% of cases, more than one CC area is affected. CC: Corpus callosum