The Journal of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 9--36

Management of fatigue in neurological disorders: Implications for rehabilitation


Fary Khan1, Bhasker Amatya2 
1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne; Australian Rehabilitation Research Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria; School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
2 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne; Australian Rehabilitation Research Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Bhasker Amatya
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, 34-54 Poplar Road, Parkville, Melbourne VIC 3052
Australia

This review systematically evaluates existing evidence for the effectiveness and safety of different rehabilitation interventions for managing fatigue in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and Parkinson's disease (PD) for improved patient outcomes. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using medical and health science electronic (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library) databases for published articles up to March 1, 2018. Both reviewers applied inclusion criteria to select potential studies and extracted data independently. Overall, 56 studies (22 systematic reviews/meta-analyses, 32 randomized clinical trials, 2 controlled clinical trials) fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this review. Although existing best-evidence for many interventions is still sparse, the overall findings suggest “strong” evidence for physical activity, cognitive-educational programs, and energy conservation strategies in MS; “moderate” evidence for multidisciplinary rehabilitation in MS; home-based physical activities in stroke and TBI; hydrotherapy in MS and TBI, group-education in stroke and self-management programs in TBI; and mindfulness intervention in MS, stroke, and TBI. There was “low” evidence for exercise in PD and other physical modalities such as yoga and cooling therapy in MS, pulsed electromagnetic devices in MS and stroke; light therapy, and biofeedback in TBI. Effect of other interventions was inconclusive. Despite the available range of rehabilitation interventions for management of fatigue in neurological conditions, there is lack of high-quality evidence for many modalities. More robust research is needed with appropriate study design, timing and intensity of modalities, and associated costs.


How to cite this article:
Khan F, Amatya B. Management of fatigue in neurological disorders: Implications for rehabilitation.J Int Soc Phys Rehabil Med 2018;1:9-36


How to cite this URL:
Khan F, Amatya B. Management of fatigue in neurological disorders: Implications for rehabilitation. J Int Soc Phys Rehabil Med [serial online] 2018 [cited 2022 Sep 30 ];1:9-36
Available from: https://www.jisprm.org/article.asp?issn=2349-7904;year=2018;volume=1;issue=2;spage=9;epage=36;aulast=Khan;type=0